O U R     M O D E L

We Live We LearnTM is for America’s forgotten children, those whose vulnerability is increased by their lack of a stable home, and/or an unfavorable relationship with family. For these children, their chance of returning home is severely limited.

We Live We LearnTM is a transitional housing location created to be a co-living environment. It will be developed through Evidence Based Design as a human centered space. All of the elements of supportive transitional housing will remain, and the residents will have the added benefit of a well thought-out living environment that will support their emotional healing, educational experience, and life sustaining career skills.

We Live We LearnTM is for America’s forgotten children, those whose vulnerability is increased by their lack of a stable home, and/or an unfavorable relationship with family. For these children, their chance of returning home is severely limited.

We Live We LearnTM is a transitional housing location created to be a co-living environment. It will be developed through Evidence Based Design as a human centered space. All of the elements of supportive transitional housing will remain, and the residents will have the added benefit of a well thought-out living environment that will support their emotional healing, educational experience, and life sustaining career skills.

Evidence Based Design is a field of study emphasizing credible evidence to influence design. This approach has become popular in healthcare to improve patient and staff well-being, patient healing, stress reduction and safety.

Both in transitional and permanent housing, Evidence Based Design can appeal business and administrative leaders. It offers them the prospect of reduced costs and/or improved organizational performance. In a housing affordability study, researchers Joseph Harkness and Sandra Newman at Johns Hopkins University modeled how housing costs impact nutrition, residential mobility, parental stress, which in turn impacts parenting/nurturing, which results in specific health outcomes and cognitive development.

Early evidence based work in shelters for homeless resulted in the identification of psychological constructs that were emerging as patterns in resident needs. They included:

  • Need for organization that lends peace of mind
  • Need for internal control and self determination
  • Need for sense of others acknowledgement
  • Need to minimize stress and fear
  • Need to secure and maintain sense of positive identity

 

Evidence Based Design is a field of study emphasizing credible evidence to influence design. This approach has become popular in healthcare to improve patient and staff well-being, patient healing, stress reduction and safety.

Both in transitional and permanent housing, Evidence Based Design can appeal business and administrative leaders. It offers them the prospect of reduced costs and/or improved organizational performance. In a housing affordability study, researchers Joseph Harkness and Sandra Newman at Johns Hopkins University modeled how housing costs impact nutrition, residential mobility, parental stress, which in turn impacts parenting/nurturing, which results in specific health outcomes and cognitive development.

Early evidence based work in shelters for homeless resulted in the identification of psychological constructs that were emerging as patterns in resident needs. They included:

  • Need for organization that lends peace of mind
  • Need for internal control and self determination
  • Need for sense of others acknowledgement
  • Need to minimize stress and fear
  • Need to secure and maintain sense of positive identity